LinkPHL, City of Philadelphia, and African American Museum in Philadelphia Launch Photography Series to Rediscover Black History

To celebrate Black History Month, LinkPHL kiosks will display photos from the Museum’s collection highlighting major moments during the1960s civil rights movement in Philadelphia

 

LinkPHL, the City of Philadelphia, and the African American Museum in Philadelphia (AAMP) launched “Rediscover Black History,” a campaign that brings historic photography of the civil rights movement in Philadelphia to the streets of Center City. To help celebrate Black History Month, the 55-inch digital displays on LinkPHL Wi-Fi kiosks will showcase photographs of rallies, protest marches, and civil rights leaders in Philadelphia during the1960s. The campaign pulls from AAMP’s acclaimed Jack T. Franklin Collection and will run throughout February.

“As one of the first campaigns to be featured on LinkPHL, we are honored to partner with the African American Museum in Philadelphia to showcase such important moments in Philadelphia’s — and our country’s — history,” said Ruth Fasoldt, Link’s Director of External Affairs. “One of our goals for LinkPHL is to enrich the lives of Philadelphians through local content partnerships that provide important perspectives and expertise about life in the city. We are thrilled to bring this collaboration to the streets for residents and visitors to enjoy and reflect on.”

 

“It is incredibly humbling to play a role in bringing this rich part of Philadelphia’s heritage alive,” said Michael Carroll, Deputy Managing Director for Transportation with the Philadelphia Office of Transportation, Infrastructure, and Sustainability. “By sharing this campaign so publicly, we are engaging Philadelphians to celebrate those who lived it while reflecting and taking stock of where we’ve been and where we need to be going as a City. Our mantra is, ‘We meet in the Street.’ Commemorations like this confirm the truth in that and make clear that our public rights of way are among Philadelphia’s greatest civic spaces.”

“The LinkPHL kiosks present the perfect opportunity for Philadelphians to rediscover Philadelphia’s Black History,” stated Patricia Wilson Aden, President & CEO of the African American Museum in Philadelphia. “These iconic images from the Jack T. Franklin Collection will remind many and educate others about this transformative era in our city’s history. We are thrilled to collaborate with LinkPHL and the City of Philadelphia in this innovative approach to informing the public about Philadelphia’s vital role in America’s civil rights movement.”

AAMP’S Jack T. Franklin Collection consists of over 500,000 negatives and photographs that Franklin (1922 – 2009), a famed local photographer, donated to the museum in 1986. The collection represents a significant history of virtually every social, cultural and political event in Philadelphia’s African American community throughout much of the 20th century. Curated from the Jack Franklin Civil Rights Era Collection, the Rediscover Black History campaign includes photographs of significant political events and rallies, such as the 1963 March on Washington and the 1966 NAACP protest march on City Hall, as well as images of local activists such as the Philly Freedom Fighters and Cecil B. Moore, and national movement leaders, including Rep. John Lewis and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

About The African American Museum in Philadelphia

Founded in 1976 in celebration of the nation’s bicentennial, the African American Museum In Philadelphia is the first institution funded and built by a major municipality to preserve, interpret and exhibit the heritage of African Americans. The mission of the museum is to bring together diverse communities in a greater appreciation of the Black experience through the combined narrative of art, history, and culture. Throughout its evolution, the museum has objectively interpreted and presented the achievements and aspirations of African Americans from pre-colonial times to the current day. For more information, visit our website at https://www.aampmuseum.org/.